However, their voices are quite different, and they live side by side in eastern Mexico without interbreeding. With dark gray upperparts and a neat white tip to the tail, the Eastern Kingbird looks like it’s wearing a business suit. Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) bird calls and sounds on dibird.com. They stop the song once the sun … Couch's Kingbirds have a slightly greener cast to the upperparts and on balance a shorter bill, but the best way to distinguish the two species is to listen to their calls—Couch's makes a distinctive, grating kip-kip-breeeer. Couch's Kingbird is a large, yellow-and-gray flycatcher that looks nearly identical to the more widespread Tropical Kingbird. Tropical kingbirds are active during the day and at night. Large yellow-bellied flycatcher with gray head, greenish back, and brownish wings and tail. Relatively stout bill. As suggested by its scientific name vociferans, Cassin's is our noisiest kingbird (except for the very localized Thick-billed). Couch's Kingbirds have a slightly greener cast to the upperparts and on balance a shorter bill, but the best way to distinguish the two species is to listen to their calls—Couch's makes a distinctive, grating kip-kip-breeeer. The dawn song happens before daylight and before other birds begin singing. Couch's Kingbirds are common around woodland edges and near ponds and rivers in southern Texas during the summer, and a few remain all winter there. They communicate using a series of vocalizations. One vocalization is the "dawn song." Distinguished from Tropical Kingbird by voice: single The flycatchers are the only suboscine passerines found in North America north of Mexico. One of the most common sights in Middle and South America, the handsome Tropical Kingbird sits on utility lines, fences, and exposed trees seemingly everywhere. Tropical Kingbird /tirano tropical (Tyrannus melancholicus) Voice: In a nutshell, the vocalizations of Tropical Kingbirds have a more monotone, metallic quality, while Couch’s Kingbird are more varied and “breezy.” The calls of Tropical Kingbirds are a series of sharp, staccato “pip-pip-pip-pip” notes that accelerate toward the end. Males have a strident "dawn song," a rising berg-berg-berg-BERG, often heard at first light but rarely later in the day, sometimes confused with song of Buff-collared Nightjar. Their song is innate, and does not contain a learned component. Possibly it has more need for vocal communication because it lives in denser habitat than most. Breeding in South America, Middle America, North America: sw USA to c Argentina; can be seen in 32 countries. Tropical Kingbird bird photo call and song/ Tyrannus melancholicus This Texas specialty is almost identical to the Tropical Kingbird, and was considered a race of that species until the 1980s. Tropical Kingbird habitat, behavior, diet, migration patterns, conservation status, and nesting. ... (songbirds), and hence have less-developed and less-elaborate songs. Couch's Kingbird is a large, yellow-and-gray flycatcher that looks nearly identical to the more widespread Tropical Kingbird. Nearly identical to Tropical Kingbird and very similar to other yellow-bellied kingbirds. These big, gray-and-yellow flycatchers catch insects on impressive pursuit flights, usually returning to the same perch to eat their catch. And this big-headed, broad-shouldered bird does mean business—just watch one harassing crows, Red-tailed Hawks, Great Blue Herons, and other birds that pass over its territory.